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6 Stretches for Sciatica Pain Relief

The best back stretches will help relieve your sciatica pain as well as other types of lower back pain. You need to choose one or two stretches that work for you and then stick with them. It’s not always easy to remember all the different positions, but it’s important to try out each position until you feel comfortable in doing it regularly.

There are many ways to perform these stretches, but here are a few of the most common ones:

Reclining Pigeon Pose – This is one of my favorite back stretches because it helps relieve lower back pain from any cause. Lie on your side with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Slowly bend over so that your legs touch the floor while keeping your torso straight. Hold this position for five seconds and then slowly return to the starting position. Repeat 10 times.

– This is one of my favorite back stretches because it helps relieve lower back pain from any cause. Lie on your side with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Slowly bend over so that your legs touch the floor while keeping your torso straight. Hold this position for five seconds and then slowly return to the starting position. Repeat 10 times.

Seated Pigeon Pose – If you suffer from sciatica pain, this is another great stretch for you to try. Sit down on the floor and bend one of your legs so that your foot rests on the inside of your other leg’s thigh. Gently push your foot into your inner thigh as you lean forward. Hold this position for five seconds and then slowly return to the starting position. Repeat 10 times.

If you suffer from sciatica pain, this is another great stretch for you to try. Sit down on the floor and bend one of your legs so that your foot rests on the inside of your other leg’s thigh. Gently push your foot into your inner thigh as you lean forward. Hold this position for five seconds and then slowly return to the starting position. Repeat 10 times.

Seated Spinal Stretch – This is a good position to use if you don’t want to use a yoga mat or towel. Sit down on the floor with your legs stretched out in front of you. Cross your left leg over your right leg and then grab your left ankle. Slowly pull your left foot toward your buttocks while keeping the rest of your body straight. Hold this position for five seconds and then slowly return to the starting position. Repeat 10 times.

The following link takes you to a chart of more than 30 different stretches that you can try.

Sciatica Treatment At Home

While there are many things that you can do at home to help your sciatica pain, you also need to be aware of some of the things that may make your pain worse. It is very important to pay attention to your body and how different activities make you feel. If you notice certain movements or postures that seem to make your pain worse, then you need to try and avoid those as much as possible.

Here are some common “no-no’s” for people with sciatica:

Sitting for long periods of time. It’s best to get up at least once an hour and walk around.

It’s best to get up at least once an hour and walk around. Sleeping on your stomach. If you have to sleep on your stomach, make sure to place several pillows underneath your hips and raise them up so that your back is in a more neutral position.

If you have to sleep on your stomach, make sure to place several pillows underneath your hips and raise them up so that your back is in a more neutral position. Riding in a car for long periods of time. If you absolutely have to, make sure to take breaks and stretch your legs by walking around while you’re driving.

If you absolutely have to, make sure to take breaks and stretch your legs by walking around while you’re driving. Lifting heavy objects. When you do have to lift something heavy, make sure to bend your knees and keep your back as straight as possible.

Make sure to get up out of bed the same way that you got into it. This will prevent you from twisting your back when you get up in the morning.

This will prevent you from twisting your back when you get up in the morning. Sitting for long periods of time. Every hour, you should get up and move around for at least five minutes. This will increase the blood flow to your back and help prevent muscle spasms.

Sources:

Back pain and sciatica (JW Frymoyer – New England Journal of Medicine, 1988 – Mass Medical Soc)
https://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJM198802043180506

Determinants of sciatica and low-back pain. (M Heliövaara, M Mäkelä, P Knekt, O Impivaara… – Spine, 1991 – europepmc.org)
https://europepmc.org/article/med/1830689

Bed rest for acute low‐back pain and sciatica (KB Hagen, G Hilde, G Jamtvedt… – Cochrane database of …, 2004 – cochranelibrary.com)
https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD001254.pub2/abstract

Risk factors for low back pain and sciatica (M Heliövaara – Annals of medicine, 1989 – Taylor & Francis)
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3109/07853898909149202

Sciatica (JP Valat, S Genevay, M Marty, S Rozenberg… – Best Practice & Research …, 2010 – Elsevier)
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1521694209001417

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